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Interview in Friday magazine

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You can read my author interview in Friday magazine here.



My answer to this question: "What is one book that everyone must read?" is tongue-in-cheek. Obviously there is only one book in the world whose proponents think should be read by everyone. Open my interview to find out which one!

My second answer is also right in line with my beliefs about what kind of book everyone should actually be reading. Those of you who have read my articles over the years, advocating for food and planetary security through less meat eating, will understand why I answered as I did.

"The Fourth Child" in Living Magazine

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My short story "The Fourth Child" is now published in the October issue of Living Magazine. Buy the big fat copy! 
Check out the cover here: http://www.living.com.np/


THE LITTLE GIRL WHO DIED

A version of this appeared in the World Literature Today in 2010. THIS IS A WORK OF FICTION. The story does not represent any moment that occurred during the real civil conflict in Nepal. Names, characters, places and incidents either are products of the author's imagination or are used fictitiously. The little girl is a metaphor for all the innocent people who died in the crossfire. 

THE LITTLE GIRL WHO DIED
SUSHMA JOSHI

Major Krishna Basnet jerked his bitten hand back, as if stung. Tooth marks, where the seven-year old girl had bitten him, left dark indentations in the hollow between his thumb and forefinger.

The Major stared at the tear-stained face of the little girl. Then he spat into her defiant eyes. “You should have learnt to respect your elders, you bitch.”

  A cold moon glittered in the black sky. No wind stirred the leaves. The Major’s voice carried upwards, towards where Ambika lay, hiding. Ambika could hear and see everything from where she was—a recessed led…

The jyotish astrological analysis of Robin Williams' death

Do you own a Nook, and read in Spanish? If so, download my play!

And in case you own a Nook, here's my play  Maté al padre de mi mejor amiga in the Barnes and Noble website for you to download.

Where does the magic realism come from?

Future books: A historical novel about Nepal

A young man from England who I recently met sent me this email after reading my book:

Sat, Apr 19, 2014
I very much enjoyed reading your short stories in the Prediction. Most of all I liked the historical ones, the Promise and the Prediction. Rana-era Nepal was vividly realised, the characters seemed very true to the period and to their social station, and the synthesis of traditional Sanskritic forms of belief and practice, such as astrology, with modernity -- as represented by democracy and revolution, intruding on the feudal court-politics of the late Ranas -- made for a highly satisfying parable of Nepal's rites of passage through the twentieth century. It occured to me that I've not come across any other examples of Nepali historical fiction, in English at least, and this would be a very fruitful genre for writers to take up. I would love to see you turn your hand to a historical novel, maybe one that features astrology as a major component, since you seem to know a lot abo…

Republica review: The Prediction

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Through a spyglassSEWA BHATTARAI Though Sushma Joshi names her book The Prediction, it is not very predictable. Most stories in this collection have surprise endings, or even begin from strange subject lines. For example, there is her first story about a man getting lost in Mongolia, and another about a satellite that crashes among the Himalaya, both very unusual subjects for Nepali writers.

Sushma sets the tone right at the start with a very readable story. The Discovery of the High Lama has an intriguing subject matter and enough dialogue so that the reader is not bored. Her plot, too, holds the reader’s interest till the very end. And that perhaps defines most of her stories: unusual subject matters, lots of dialogue, and interesting plots.

When it comes to the subjects she addresses, they are a wide variety: From a Nepali drummer making a life in Europe to an astrologer in Mohan Shumsher’s court. Sushma seems to know a lot about each of these subject matters, and the tidbits she s…

List Challenges: "End of the World" in Read the World Proportionally

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Once in a while, the Internet sends you a delightful find. 
And none more so than this one, on Nepali New Year's day. "The End of the World" is listed in this incredible list compiled by Ng Yi-Sheng, who decided to compile a list of 100 books that reflects the world as it is, demographically.

The list is available in List Challenges, and it is a list than any author would be honored to find himself/herself in. Not just because its a list of books that I would love to read (all of them), but also because there's a certain sense of comfort and "coming home" to a list that does include the breadth and diversity of the world, as it is. I say this beats any "100 books" list compiled by TIME.

Of course, that's a bit on the self-promotional side, you may say. Well, even if I wasn't on the list, I'd still say it's a better list than any compiled by TIME! Just click on it, you'll see. In his interesting blog "Around the World in 8…

"The Prediction" in Himalaya

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My story "The Prediction" is now out in Himalaya, a journal of the Association of Nepal and Himalaya studies published by Yale University. You can download it here.


A Boleria for Love